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Max Seeck’s mantra at SIBF: Just write

At the 42nd Sharjah International Book Fair (SIBF), Max Seeck, the celebrated Finnish author renowned for his captivating and intricately woven crime novels, emphasized that the core of your path to becoming a writer lies in the act of writing.

Seeck’s words brought his literary creations to life, offering the young audience a unique glimpse into the mind responsible for crafting numerous best-selling mysteries.

When questioned about his ‘creative process,’ he shared, “Every day, I make an effort to dedicate two to three hours to writing, despite all the distractions, and this routine has remained unchanged over the years.”

Seeck’s insights into the world of crime fiction and the art of crafting suspenseful plots captivated the students, who were eager to fathom the inner workings of a bestselling author’s mind.

“I believe that the most crucial aspect of becoming a writer is to write. I’m not trying to be humorous here. I often encounter young aspiring writers, and when I ask them if they’ve started writing, most of them answer in the negative. To them, I pose the question, ‘What are you waiting for?'” Seeck remarked, emphasizing that one should not delay for the ‘perfect time’ or the ‘ideal story’ to emerge. “If you wish to be a writer, you simply have to write.”

Seeck’s narratives often incorporate elements of psychology, forensics, and the darker facets of human nature. When discussing how he integrates these elements into his stories, he delved into the extensive research required to craft authentic and engrossing crime narratives.

“I invest a significant amount of time in research, and I have friends and acquaintances who collaborate with professionals in the fields of law enforcement, law, medicine, and forensics. Therefore, my writing draws from this wealth of insight, in addition to what I observe on television or imagine,” explained the 38-year-old author, acknowledging the toil of writers like Agatha Christie who worked in a pre-internet era. “Now, with the internet, it has become much easier. If I need to understand the impact of a gunshot wound on the body, I can simply search online. So yes, research is an integral part of my process, but it has evolved over the years.”

The event’s highlight was an animated Q&A session, where students had the opportunity to pose various questions to Seeck. Their inquiries ranged from his favorite character to the inspirations behind his books.

“It’s truly challenging to pinpoint a single source of inspiration, as I find it in many things. For instance, as soon as I leave this event, I plan to take a walk to the beach here in Sharjah, and I might draw inspiration from what I see and hear. This event, witnessing all of you, is incredibly inspiring, and I think this is the most inspiring moment of the entire year,” Seeck shared, prompting a resounding cheer from the gathered crowd.

Max Seeck’s upcoming book, ‘Ghost Island,’ is scheduled for release in 2024.”

 

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